News About Aging

Posted By Christine Hoffman

Aging News & Research: January 22-26, 2018

  • Conceptual and Empirical Approaches to Financial Decision-making by Older Adults: Results from a Financial Decision-making Rating Scale. Peter A. Lichtenberg, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.; Katja Ocepek-Welikson, M.Phil.; Lisa J. Ficker,  Ph.D.; Evan Gross, M.A.; Analise Rahman-Filipiak, Ph.D.; and Jeanne A. Teresi, Ed.D., Ph.D. Clinical Gerontologist, Volume 41, 2018 – Issue 1, pages 42-65. Published online: October 27, 2017. The LFDRS thus offers clinicians and researchers alike a novel way to assess capacity for financial decision-making.
  • Risk Profiles for Injurious Falls in People Over 60: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Stina Ek, M.Sc.; Debora Rizzuto, Ph.D.; Laura Fratiglioni, M.D., Ph.D.; Kristina Johnell, Ph.D.; Weili Xu, M.D., Ph.D.; Anna-Karin Welmer, Ph.D. The Journals of Gerontology: Series A, Medical Sciences, Volume 73, Issue 2, January 16, 2018, pages 233-239. Published online: June 9, 2017. Five clusters were identified including: a “healthy,” a “well-functioning with multimorbidity,” a “well-functioning, with multimorbidity and high FRID consumption,” a “physically and cognitively impaired,” and a “disabled” cluster. The risk of injurious falls for all groups was significantly higher than for the first cluster of healthy individuals.
Posted By Christine Hoffman

Aging Research & Issues: January 16-19, 2018

  • Applying a Treatment Effects Model to Investigate Public Amenity Effect on Physical Activity of the Elderly.  Chia-Yu Yeh, PhD, Chen-Kang Chang, PhD & Feng-An Yang, MS.  Journal of Aging & Social Policy, Volume 30, 2018 – Issue 1, Pages 72-86 . Published online:  October 11, 2017.  Providing sufficient and accessible parks in metropolitan residential neighborhoods could be one of the most cost-effective ways to promote physical activity for the elderly living in midsize Asian cities.
  • Psychosocial Mechanisms Underlying Older Black Men’s Health.  Tyson H Brown PhD, Taylor W Hargrove PhD.  The Journals of Gerontology: Series B – Psychological and Social Sciences, Volume 73, Issue 2, January 11, 2018, Pages 188–197.  Published online: August 3, 2017.  Conventional measures of stressors and coping resources—originally developed to account for variance in health outcomes among predominantly white samples—may not capture psychosocial factors most salient for older Black men’s health.
Posted By Christine Hoffman

Aging Research & Issues: January 10-12, 2018

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Posted By Marcia Siegal

Managing life with osteoarthritis

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the nation, affecting more than 50 million adults in the United States. It is most common among women and occurs more frequently as people age. Arthritis is not a single disease, but rather a term referring to general joint pain or stiffness. There are more than 100 […]

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Posted By Marcia Siegal

‘The New Senior Man’ book offers men stories, advice

“Today’s senior men have a gift of time – more than any generations before them,” said Thelma Reese, coauthor of “The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities” (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017). “It’s a time that is rife with opportunity to learn, to explore, and to discover the universe and themselves.”

Posted By Christine Hoffman

Aging Research & Issues: January 3-6, 2018

  • Fusing Biodiversity Metrics into Investigations of Daily Life: Illustrations and Recommendations With Emodiversity.  Lizbeth Benson, Nilam Ram, David M Almeida, Alex J Zautra, Anthony D Ong.  The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Volume 73, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages 75–86.  Published online: March 30, 2017.  Functionalist emotion and ecological systems theories suggest emodiversity—the variety and relative abundance of individuals’ emotion experiences—is beneficial for psychological and physical health and may change with age.
  • Evaluation of Rewind Yoga on Physical Function Outcomes in Older Adults: A Preliminary Study.  Andrew I. Miller, Cheryl Der Ananian, Carrie Hensley  & Heidi Ungar.  Activities, Adaptation & Aging,  Volume 41, 2017 – Issue 4, Pages 291-300.  Published online:  July 6, 2017.  Few yoga programs tailored to the unique needs of older adults exist. Rewind Yoga™ was created to address this gap and a pilot study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the program on physical function parameters.
Follow these tips to avoid cold stress. (Thinkstock)
Posted By Marcia Siegal

Tips to help avoid cold stress

The elderly population is disproportionately affected by hypothermia (commonly known as cold stress), caused by excessive body heat loss and exposure to cold. Those who don’t dress warmly enough; live in a cold room or house; lack shelter from the snow, rain, wind, and water; eat poorly and take certain prescription medications* are at risk for cold stress. Cold stress can happen indoors, even at temperatures as mild as 60°- 70°F. People can help protect themselves by following some simple guidelines, according to Sharon Congleton, RN, BSN, health promotion nurse supervisor at Philadelphia Corporation for Aging (PCA).

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Posted By Marcia Siegal

Alzheimer’s caregiving offers rewards

About 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. The bulk of their care – 83 percent – falls on unpaid family members.

Posted By Christine Hoffman

Aging Research & Issues: December 5-8, 2017

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